Interesting facts carbon dating

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Carbon is one of the most important elements to life on planet Earth.

It forms more compounds than any other element and forms the basis to all plant and animal life.

Radiocarbon dating uses the naturally occurring isotope Carbon-14 to approximate the age of organic materials. Often, archaeologists use graves and plant remains to date sites.

Since its conception by Willard Libby in 1949, it has been invaluable to the discipline.

Standard calibration curves are now used for more accurate readings.

These curves indicate the changes in Carbon-14 throughout the years and modifies the end result of the tests to reflect that.

In fact, many important archaeological artifacts have been dated using this method including some of the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Shroud of Turin.

Humans began making an impact during the Industrial Revolution.

Though the calibrated date is more precise, many scholars still use the uncalibrated date in order to keep chronologies consistent in academic communities.

Though it’s biggest, the calibration problem is not the only flaw of radiocarbon dating.

In last Tuesday’s lecture, radiocarbon dating was covered briefly.

It is an essential technology that is heavily involved in archaeology and should be explored in greater depth.

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